PerfeCTa SYBR® Green FastMix

Super. Fast. PerfeCTa.

Features & Benefits

  • 2X concentrated master mixes with stabilized SYBR Green dye and exceptional temperature stability (≥30 days at 22°C) that withstand repetitive freeze-thaw (≥ 20X).
  • Rigorously optimized for both fast and conventional thermal cycling parameters.
  • Supports efficient vortex mixing with proprietary anti-foaming technology.
  • Maximizes assay sensitivity and target precision with highly modified Taq DNA polymerase and stringent ultrapure, AccuFast™ II antibody hotstart technology

 

PerfeCTa SYBR Green FastMix is intended for molecular biology applications. This product is not intended for the diagnosis, prevention or treatment of a disease.

Description

PerfeCTa SYBR Green FastMix is a 2X concentrated, ready-to-use reaction cocktail that contains all components, except primers and DNA template. This rigorously optimized master mix contains of proprietary buffer technology, stabilizers and AccuFast Taq DNA polymerase to deliver maximum assay precision, sensitivity, and PCR efficiency for accelerated or conventional thermal cycling conditions for SYBR Green detection. Dye-based detection methods are critically dependent on highly specific amplification because dsDNA dyes will bind to any amplicon, including off-target primer elongation and primer dimerization. AccuFast hot start Taq DNA polymerase contains a proprietary mixture of ultra-pure monoclonal antibodies that stringently suppress primer elongation prior to the initial PCR denaturation step and allows for setup and multi-day storage at ambient room temperature prior to thermal cycling. AccuFast provides rapid release of fully active enzyme to support accelerated thermal cycling conditions.

Performance Data

Comparison to Finnzymes, ADAR


PerfeCTa SYBR Green FastMix Comparison to DyNAmo Flash SYBR Green PCR Kit

RNA-specific adenosine deaminase (ADAR) was amplified from log-fold dilutions of total HeLa cell cDNA (100 ng to 10 pg) using PerfeCTa™ SYBR Green FastMix or the DyNAmo Flash SYBR Green PCR Kit (Finnzymes) according to each manufacturers protocol. Averaged plots for quadruplicate reactions for each input quantity are shown. Fusion of DNA-binding peptide to Tbr DNA pol results in lower specificity of the DyNAmo kit which is evident in false positive results for no template control (NTC) reactions. Chemically modified polymerase produces delayed Cts and lower signal strength compared to AccuStart™ Taq. Cycling conditions: Finnzymes: 95°C, 7 min followed by 40 cycles of 95°C, 10s; 60°C, 20s PerfeCTa™ SYBR Green FastMix: 95°C, 20s followed by 40 cycles of 95°C, 1s; 60°C, 20s


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Comparison to Takara, ADAR


PerfeCTa SYBR Green FastMix Comparison to SYBR PreMix Ex Taq

RNA-specific adenosine deaminase (ADAR) was amplified from log-fold dilutions of total HeLa cell cDNA (100 ng to 10 pg) using PerfeCTa&trade; SYBR Green FastMix or SYBR PreMix Ex Taq&trade; (Takara) according to each manufacturers protocol. Averaged plots for quadruplicate reactions for each input quantity are shown. PerfeCTa&trade; SYBR Green FastMix produces higher fluorescent signal and detection of equal target amounts at earlier Cts. Cycling conditions for both kits: 95&deg;C, 20s followed by 40 cycles of 95&deg;C, 1s; 60&deg;C, 20s


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Comparison to SYBR GreenER, ADAR


PerfeCTa SYBR Green FastMix comparison to SYBR GreenER qPCR SuperMix

RNA-specific adenosine deaminase (ADAR) was amplified from log-fold dilutions of total HeLa cell cDNA (100 ng to 1 pg) using PerfeCTa&trade; SYBR Green FastMix or the SYBR GreenER qPCR SuperMix (Invitrogen) according to each manufacturers protocol. Averaged plots for quadruplicate reactions for each input quantity are shown. Replicate CT values are shown on the standard curve (Panel A, inset). Cycling conditions: Invitrogenn: 95&deg;C, 10 min followed by 40 cycles of 95&deg;C, 10s; 60&deg;C, 60s; PerfeCTa&trade; SYBR Green FastMix: 95&deg;C, 20s followed by 40 cycles of 95&deg;C, 1s; 60&deg;C, 20s. PerfeCTa SYBR Green FastMix amplified the ADAR gene with higher efficiency and greater sensitivity. All replicate reactions for SYBR GreenER qPCR SuperMix failed to amplify ADAR from 1 pg of cDNA.


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Details

  • Contents

    Single-tube, 2X concentrated reagent containing:

    • Reaction buffer with optimized concentrations of molecular-grade MgCl2, dATP, dCTP, dGTP, and dTTP.
    • AccuStart II Taq DNA Polymerase
    • SYBR Green I dye
    • Inert AccuVue dye
    • Proprietary enzyme stabilizers and performance-enhancing additives.
    • Titrated reference dye (if applicable)
  • Storage & Handling
    PerfeCTa SYBR Green FastMix is stable for 1 year when stored in a constant temperature freezer at -20°C, protected from light. For convenience, it may be stored unfrozen at 4°C for up to 6 months. After thawing, mix thoroughly before using. Stabilized reagent demonstrates no functional loss of performance after 20 freeze-thaw cycles or 2 months at 20°C.
  • Instrument Capability
    ROX
    • Applied Biosystems 5700
    • Applied Biosystems 7000
    • Applied Biosystems 7300
    • Applied Biosystems 7700
    • Applied Biosystems 7900
    • Applied Biosystems 7900HT
    • Applied Biosystems 7900 HT Fast
    • Applied Biosystems StepOne™
    • Applied Biosystems StepOnePlus™
    Low ROX
    • Applied Biosystems 7500
    • Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast
    • Stratagene Mx3000P®
    • Stratagene Mx3005P™
    • Stratagene Mx4000™
    • Applied Biosystems ViiA 7
    • Applied Biosystems QuantStudio™
    • Agilent AriaMx
    • Douglas Scientific IntelliQube®
    • QIAGEN Rotor-Gene Q
    No ROX
    • BioRad CFX
    • Roche LightCycler 480
    • Other
    Bio-Rad iCycler iQ systems
    • BioRad iCycler iQ™
    • BioRad MyiQ™
    • BioRad iQ™5
  • Related Resources
    Product Manuals
    Product Flyers
    Safety Data Sheets (SDS)
    CofA (PSF)
    Publications
    Loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification for asymptomatic malaria detection in challenging field settings: Technical performance and pilot implementation in the Peruvian Amazon
    Elisa Serra-Casas, PLOS ONE - 2017
    Abstract
    Background Loop-mediated isothermal DNA amplification (LAMP) methodology offers an opportunity for point-of-care (POC) molecular detection of asymptomatic malaria infections. However, there is still little evidence on the feasibility of implementing this technique for population screenings in isolated field settings. Methods Overall, we recruited 1167 individuals from terrestrial (‘road’) and hydric (‘riverine’) communities of the Peruvian Amazon for a cross-sectional survey to detect asymptomatic malaria infections. The technical performance of LAMP was evaluated in a subgroup of 503 samples, using real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) as reference standard. The operational feasibility of introducing LAMP testing in the mobile screening campaigns was assessed based on field-suitability parameters, along with a pilot POC-LAMP assay in a riverine community without laboratory infrastructure. Results LAMP had a sensitivity of 91.8% (87.7–94.9) and specificity of 91.9% (87.8–95.0), and the overall accuracy was significantly better among samples collected during road screenings than riverine communities (p≤0.004). LAMP-based diagnostic strategy was successfully implemented within the field-team logistics and the POC-LAMP pilot in the riverine community allowed for a reduction in the turnaround time for case management, from 12–24 hours to less than 5 hours. Specimens with haemolytic appearance were regularly observed in riverine screenings and could help explaining the hindered performance/interpretation of the LAMP reaction in these communities. Conclusions LAMP-based molecular malaria diagnosis can be deployed outside of reference laboratories, providing similar performance as qPCR. However, scale-up in remote field settings such as riverine communities needs to consider a number of logistical challenges (e.g. environmental conditions, labour-intensiveness in large population screenings) that can influence its optimal implementation.
    Solar thermotherapy reduces the titer of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus and enhances canopy growth by altering gene expression profiles in HLB-affected citrus plants
    Melissa M Doud, Horticulture Research - 2017
    Abstract
    Huanglongbing (HLB), a systemic and destructive disease of citrus, is associated with ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las) in the United States. Our earlier work has shown that Las bacteria were significantly reduced or eliminated when potted HLB-affected citrus were continuously exposed to high temperatures of 40 to 42 °C for a minimum of 48 h. To determine the feasibility and effectiveness of solar thermotherapy in the field, portable plastic enclosures were placed over commercial and residential citrus, exposing trees to high temperatures through solarization. Within 3–6 weeks after treatment, most trees responded with vigorous new growth. Las titer in new growth was greatly reduced for 18–36 months after treatment. Unlike with potted trees, exposure to high heat did not eradicate the Las population under field conditions. This may be attributed to reduced temperatures at night in the field compared to continuous high temperature exposure that can be maintained in growth chambers, and the failure to achieve therapeutic temperatures in the root zone. Despite the presence of Las in heat-treated commercial citrus, many trees produced abundant flush and grew vigorously for 2 to 3 years after treatment. Transcriptome analysis comparing healthy trees to HLB-affected citrus both before and after heat treatment demonstrated that post-treatment transcriptional expression patterns more closely resembled the expression patterns of healthy controls for most differentially expressed genes and that genes involved with plant-bacterium interactions are upregulated after heat treatment. Overall, these results indicate that solar thermotherapy can be an effective component of an integrated control strategy for citrus HLB.
    Protective role of Indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase in Respiratory Syncytial Virus associated immune response in airway epithelial cells
    Devi Rajan, Virology - 2017
    Abstract
    RSV is a major cause of severe lower respiratory infection in infants and young children. With no vaccine yet available, it is important to clarify mechanisms of disease pathogenesis. Since indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) is an immunomodulatory enzyme and is upregulated with RSV infection, we studied it in vivo during infection of BALB/c mice and in vitro in A549 cells. RSV infection upregulated IDO transcripts in vivo and in vitro. IDO siRNA decreased IDO transcripts ~2 fold compared to control siRNA after RSV infection but this decrease did not affect RSV replication. In the presence of IFN-γ, siRNA-induced a decrease in IDO expression that was associated with an increase in virus replication and increased levels of IL-6, IL-8, CXCL10 and CCL4. Thus, our results show IDO is upregulated with RSV infection and this upregulation likely participates with IFN-γ in inhibition of virus replication and suppression of some host cell responses to infection.
    Human Metapneumovirus Induces Formation of Inclusion Bodies for Efficient Genome Replication and Transcription
    Nicolás Cifuentes-Muñoz, Journal of Virology - 2017
    Abstract
    Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) causes significant upper and lower respiratory disease to all age groups worldwide. The virus possesses a negative-sense single-stranded RNA genome of approximately 13.3 Kb encapsidated by multiple copies of the nucleoprotein (N), giving rise to helical nucleocapsids. In addition, copies of the phosphoprotein (P) and the large RNA polymerase (L) decorate the viral nucleocapsids. After viral attachment, endocytosis, and fusion mediated by the viral glycoproteins, HMPV nucleocapsids are released into the cell cytoplasm. To visualize the subsequent steps of genome transcription and replication, a fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) protocol was established to detect different viral RNA subpopulations in infected cells. The FISH probes were specific for detection of HMPV positive-sense RNA (+RNA) and genomic RNA (vRNA). Time-course analysis of human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells infected with HMPV revealed the formation of inclusion bodies (IBs) from early times post-infection. HMPV IBs were shown to be cytoplasmic sites of active transcription and replication, with translation of viral proteins closely associated. Inclusion body formation was consistent with an actin-dependent coalescence of multiple early replicative sites. Time-course RT-qPCR analysis suggested that coalescence of inclusion bodies is a strategy to efficiently replicate and transcribe the viral genome. These results provide a better understanding of the steps following HMPV entry and have important clinical implications. IMPORTANCE Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is a recently discovered pathogen that affects human populations of all ages worldwide. Reinfections are common throughout life, but no vaccines or antiviral treatments are currently available. In this work, a spatio-temporal analysis of HMPV replication and transcription in bronchial epithelial-derived immortal cells was performed. HMPV was shown to induce formation of large cytoplasmic granules, named inclusion bodies, for genome replication and transcription. Unlike other cytoplasmic structures such as stress granules and P-bodies, inclusion bodies are exclusively present in infected cells and contain HMPV RNA and proteins to more efficiently transcribe and replicate the viral genome. Though nuanced, inclusion body formation corresponds to a more generalized strategy used by different viruses, including filoviruses and rhabdoviruses, for genome transcription and replication. Thus, understanding inclusion body formation is crucial for the discovery of innovative therapeutic targets.
    TIEG and estrogen modulate SOST expression in the murine skeleton
    Malayannan Subramaniam, Journal of Cellular Physiology - 2017
    Abstract
    TIEG knockout (KO) mice exhibit a female-specific osteopenic phenotype and altered expression of TIEG in humans is associated with osteoporosis. Gene expression profiling studies identified sclerostin as one of the most highly up-regulated transcripts in the long bones of TIEG KO mice relative to WT littermates suggesting that TIEG may regulate SOST expression. TIEG was shown to substantially suppress SOST promoter activity and the regulatory elements through which TIEG functions were identified using promoter deletion and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Knockdown of TIEG in IDG-SW3 osteocyte cells using shRNA and CRISPR-Cas9 technology resulted in increased SOST expression and delayed mineralization, mimicking the results obtained from TIEG KO mouse bones. Given that TIEG is an estrogen regulated gene, and since changes in the hormonal milieu affect SOST expression, we performed ovariectomy (OVX) and estrogen replacement therapy (ERT) studies in WT and TIEG KO mice followed by miRNA and mRNA sequencing of cortical and trabecular compartments of femurs. SOST expression levels were considerably higher in cortical bone compared to trabecular bone. In cortical bone, SOST expression was increased following OVX only in WT mice and was suppressed following ERT in both genotypes. In contrast, SOST expression in trabecular bone was decreased following OVX and significantly increased following ERT. Interestingly, a number of miRNAs that are predicted to target sclerostin exhibited inverse expression levels in response to OVX and ERT. These data implicate important roles for TIEG and estrogen-regulated miRNAs in modulating SOST expression in bone. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved
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    FAQs
    Can I use PerfeCTa® SYBR® Green FastMix® instead of SYBR Green SuperMix?
    You can use FastMix instead of SuperMix. We have observed similar results with both PCR mixes, however, slightly lower background was observed using SuperMix when using 10 ng of cDNA or more in the qPCR. The qScript microRNA Quantification system has been validated using SYBR Green SuperMix.
    Click here to see all FAQs

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