AccuStart II PCR SuperMix

Robust, user-friendly 1-tube PCR SuperMix reagents for routine, general purpose PCR

Features & Benefits

  • User-friendly 2X concentrated master mix simplifies reaction setup with exceptional room-temperature stability (≥30 days at 22°C) and is impervious to repetitive freeze-thaw (≥ 20X)
  • High-yielding, ultrapure modified Taq DNA polymerase delivers robust, reliable assay sensitivity
  • Stringent, ultrapure antibody hotstart ensures sensitive and precise target amplification

 

AccuStart II PCR SuperMix is intended for molecular biology applications. This product is not intended for the diagnosis, prevention or treatment of a disease.

Description

AccuStart II PCR SuperMix is a 2X concentrated, ready-to-use reaction cocktail for routine PCR amplification of DNA fragments up to 4 kb. It contains all components, except primers and template. AccuStart II PCR SuperMix simplifies reaction assembly, improves assay reproducibility, and reduces the risk of contamination. A key component is AccuStart™ II Taq DNA polymerase which contains monoclonal antibodies that bind to the polymerase and keep it inactive prior to the initial PCR denaturation step. Upon heat activation (1 minute at 94°C), the antibodies denature irreversibly, releasing fully active, unmodified Taq DNA polymerase. This enables specific and efficient primer extension with the convenience of room temperature reaction assembly.

Details

  • Contents
    • 2X reaction buffer containing 3 mM MgCl2
    • 0.4 mM each dNTP (dATP, dCTP, dGTP, dTTP)
    • AccuStart II Taq DNA Polymerase and stabilizers.
  • Storage & Handling
    Store components in a constant temperature freezer at -25°C to -15°C upon receipt. Repeated freezing and thawing does not impair product performance. For lot specific expiry date, refer to package label, Certificate of Analysis or Product Specification Form.
  • Related Resources
    Product Manuals
    Safety Data Sheets (SDS)
    CofA (PSF)
    Publications
    A comprehensive survey of larval digenean trematodes and their snail hosts in central Alberta, Canada
    Michelle A. Gordy, Parasitology Research - 2016
    Abstract
    Digenean trematode distributions, compatibility profiles with their snail hosts, and complete life cycles remain mysteries in many parts of the world. Surveys of digenean biology and ecology provide further insight and perspective into just how incredibly diverse and important helminth parasites are in shaping local ecosystems. Past surveys have provided substantial characterizations of adult digeneans within their definitive hosts, and many now have contributed toward furthering our understanding of larval digeneans within their intermediate host communities. However, much information about the diversity of digeneans and their relationships with their snail intermediate hosts are lacking in many locations across the globe. This is certainly true in Canada, where few records related to digenean-snail relationships exist. Currently, there is a need for more information about the presence and distribution of digeneans across Canada, and how this compares to other parts of North America and beyond. To address this diversity gap in Western Canada, six lakes within central Alberta were surveyed for the presence of snails and larval digenean species and their associations. This investigation into the diversity of digeneans utilized a combined approach of morphological and molecular tools to identify 39 digenean species among five snail host species, from biweekly collections, taken over the course of 2 years (2013–2014). Here, digenean-snail combinations, presence, and distribution across sampling sites and lakes are reported. Overall, this survey contributes new information toward digenean-snail compatibility, life cycles, and distribution in Northern lake ecosystems within North America.
    Radiation of the polymorphic Little Devil poison frog (Oophaga sylvatica) in Ecuador
    Alexandre B. Roland, Ecology and Evolution - 2017
    Abstract
    Some South American poison frogs (Dendrobatidae) are chemically defended and use bright aposematic colors to warn potential predators of their unpalatability. Aposematic signals are often frequency-dependent where individuals deviating from a local model are at a higher risk of predation. However, extreme diversity in the aposematic signal has been documented in poison frogs, especially in Oophaga. Here, we explore the phylogeographic pattern among color-divergent populations of the Little Devil poison frog Oophaga sylvatica by analyzing population structure and genetic differentiation to evaluate which processes could account for color diversity within and among populations. With a combination of PCR amplicons (three mitochondrial and three nuclear markers) and genome-wide markers from a double-digested RAD (ddRAD) approach, we characterized the phylogenetic and genetic structure of 199 individuals from 13 populations (12 monomorphic and 1 polymorphic) across the O. sylvatica distribution. Individuals segregated into two main lineages by their northern or southern latitudinal distribution. A high level of genetic and phenotypic polymorphism within the northern lineage suggests ongoing gene flow. In contrast, low levels of genetic differentiation were detected among the southern lineage populations and support recent range expansions from populations in the northern lineage. We propose that a combination of climatic gradients and structured landscapes might be promoting gene flow and phylogenetic diversification. Alternatively, we cannot rule out that the observed phenotypic and genomic variations are the result of genetic drift on near or neutral alleles in a small number of genes.
    Distribution and incidence of atoxigenic Aspergillus flavus VCG in tree crop orchards in California: A strategy for identifying potential antagonists, the example of almonds
    Adeline Picot, International Journal of Food Microbiology - 2017
    Abstract
    To identify predominant isolates for potential use as biocontrol agents, Aspergillus flavus isolates collected soils of almond, pistachio and fig orchard in the Central Valley of California were tested for their membership to 16 atoxigenic vegetative compatibility groups (VCGs), including YV36, the VCG to which AF36, an atoxigenic isolate commercialized in the United States as biopesticide, belongs. A surprisingly large proportion of isolates belonged to YV36 (13.3%, 7.2% and 6.6% of the total almond, pistachio and fig populations, respectively), while the percentage of isolates belonging to the other 15 VCGs ranged from 0% to 2.3%. In order to gain a better insight into the structure and diversity of atoxigenic A. flavus populations and to further identify predominant isolates, seventeen SSR markers were then used to genetically characterize AF36, the 15 type-isolates of the VCGs and 342 atoxigenic isolates of the almond population. There was considerable genetic diversity among isolates with a lack of differentiation among micro-geographical regions or years. Since isolates sharing identical SSR profiles from distinct orchards were rare, we separated them into groups of at least 3 closely-related isolates from distinct orchards that shared identical alleles for at least 15 out of the 17 loci. This led to the identification of 15 groups comprising up to 24 closely-related isolates. The group which contained the largest number of isolates were members of YV36 while five groups were also found to be members of our studied atoxigenic VCGs. These results suggest that these 15 groups, and AF36 in particular, are well adapted to various environmental conditions in California and to tree crops and, as such, are good candidates for use as biocontrol agents.
    The non-motor adaptor HMMR dampens Eg5-mediated forces to preserve the kinetics and integrity of chromosome segregation
    Helen Chen, Molecular Biology of the Cell - 2018
    Abstract
    Mitotic spindle assembly and organization require forces generated by motor proteins. The activity of these motors is regulated by non-motor adaptor proteins. However, there are limited studies reporting the functional importance of adaptors on the balance of motor forces and the promotion of faithful and timely cell division. Here, we show that genomic deletion or siRNA silencing of the non-motor adaptor Hmmr/HMMR disturbs spindle microtubule organization and bipolar chromosome-kinetochore attachments with a consequent elevated occurrence of aneuploidy. Rescue experiments show a conserved motif in HMMR is required to generate inter-kinetochore tension and promote anaphase entry. This motif bears high homology with the kinesin Kif15 and is known to interact with TPX2, a spindle assembly factor. We find that HMMR is required to dampen kinesin Eg5-mediated forces through localizing TPX2 and promoting the formation of inhibitory TPX2-Eg5 complexes. In HMMR-silenced cells, K-fiber stability is reduced while the frequency of unattached chromosomes and the time needed for chromosome segregation are both increased. These defects can be alleviated in HMMR-silenced cells with chemical inhibition of Eg5, but not through the silencing of Kif15. Together, our findings indicate that HMMR balances Eg5-mediated forces to preserve the kinetics and integrity of chromosome segregation.
    Assessing individual patterns of Echinococcus multilocularis infection in urban coyotes: non-invasive genetic sampling as an epidemiological tool
    Stefano Liccioli, Journal of Applied Ecology - 2015
    Abstract
    * In epidemiological studies of wildlife parasites- faecal genotyping has been introduced to prevent bias in estimates of parasite prevalence from faecal samples collected in the field. Such an approach could be particularly relevant in the study of Echinococcus multilocularis transmission in urban settings- where estimates of prevalence and patterns of infection in wild canid hosts are key parameters used in zoonotic risk assessment and management. However- no previous study has evaluated the reliability of E. multilocularis faecal prevalence- and individual patterns of infection in definitive hosts remain poorly understood. * We evaluated faecal genotyping as an epidemiological tool- using E. multilocularis in urban coyotes Canis latrans as our study system. Combining parasitological analysis and multilocus individual genotyping of coyote faeces- we compared faecal parasite prevalence with the prevalence obtained from genotyped faecal samples. Furthermore- we assessed patterns of individual infection- such as re-infection rates and phenology of parasite egg excretion. * Of 425 faeces collected in five urban sites- we genotyped 142 samples (33·4\%) corresponding to 60 unique individual coyotes. Number of genotyped samples per coyote ranged between 1 and 10 (mean = 2·3). Genotypes were obtained at 4-6 microsatellite loci and had a mean reliability of 0·9975. * Faecal prevalence of E. multilocularis in genotyped coyotes was 25·0\%- and similar to results previously obtained from non-genotyped faeces. Faecal genotyping allowed estimating a re-infection rate of individual coyotes of 57·1\% and to observe temporal patterns of parasite infection that were not detected using non-genotyped faeces. * Synthesis and applications. If compared to independent data obtained through coyote post-mortem examination- our results suggest that reliable estimates of overall parasite prevalence in definitive host populations can be efficiently obtained through well-designed field collection and traditional faecal parasitological analysis. However- faecal genotyping allows assessing the dynamics of individual infections- which could otherwise only be estimated by using invasive techniques. Combining faecal genotyping with parasitology has a great potential in assessing zoonotic risk transmission in urban areas- as well as advancing the field of wildlife ecology- disease ecology and conservation.
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