US
array(52) {
  ["SERVER_SOFTWARE"]=>
  string(6) "Apache"
  ["REQUEST_URI"]=>
  string(28) "/product/sparq-library-prep/"
  ["PATH"]=>
  string(49) "/usr/local/sbin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin"
  ["PP_CUSTOM_PHP_INI"]=>
  string(48) "/var/www/vhosts/system/quantabio.com/etc/php.ini"
  ["PP_CUSTOM_PHP_CGI_INDEX"]=>
  string(19) "plesk-php74-fastcgi"
  ["SCRIPT_NAME"]=>
  string(10) "/index.php"
  ["QUERY_STRING"]=>
  string(0) ""
  ["REQUEST_METHOD"]=>
  string(3) "GET"
  ["SERVER_PROTOCOL"]=>
  string(8) "HTTP/1.1"
  ["GATEWAY_INTERFACE"]=>
  string(7) "CGI/1.1"
  ["REDIRECT_URL"]=>
  string(28) "/product/sparq-library-prep/"
  ["REMOTE_PORT"]=>
  string(5) "37304"
  ["SCRIPT_FILENAME"]=>
  string(48) "/var/www/vhosts/quantabio.com/httpdocs/index.php"
  ["SERVER_ADMIN"]=>
  string(14) "root@localhost"
  ["CONTEXT_DOCUMENT_ROOT"]=>
  string(38) "/var/www/vhosts/quantabio.com/httpdocs"
  ["CONTEXT_PREFIX"]=>
  string(0) ""
  ["REQUEST_SCHEME"]=>
  string(5) "https"
  ["DOCUMENT_ROOT"]=>
  string(38) "/var/www/vhosts/quantabio.com/httpdocs"
  ["REMOTE_ADDR"]=>
  string(13) "44.201.99.222"
  ["SERVER_PORT"]=>
  string(3) "443"
  ["SERVER_ADDR"]=>
  string(13) "172.31.63.191"
  ["SERVER_NAME"]=>
  string(17) "www.quantabio.com"
  ["SERVER_SIGNATURE"]=>
  string(0) ""
  ["HTTP_HOST"]=>
  string(17) "www.quantabio.com"
  ["HTTP_X_REAL_IP"]=>
  string(13) "185.93.229.32"
  ["HTTP_X_FORWARDED_FOR"]=>
  string(13) "44.201.99.222"
  ["HTTP_CONNECTION"]=>
  string(5) "close"
  ["HTTP_X_FORWARDED_PROTO"]=>
  string(5) "https"
  ["HTTP_X_SUCURI_CLIENTIP"]=>
  string(13) "44.201.99.222"
  ["HTTP_X_SUCURI_COUNTRY"]=>
  string(2) "US"
  ["HTTP_USER_AGENT"]=>
  string(40) "CCBot/2.0 (https://commoncrawl.org/faq/)"
  ["HTTP_ACCEPT"]=>
  string(63) "text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,*/*;q=0.8"
  ["HTTP_ACCEPT_LANGUAGE"]=>
  string(14) "en-US,en;q=0.5"
  ["HTTP_ACCEPT_ENCODING"]=>
  string(7) "br,gzip"
  ["SSL_TLS_SNI"]=>
  string(17) "www.quantabio.com"
  ["HTTPS"]=>
  string(2) "on"
  ["HTTP_AUTHORIZATION"]=>
  string(0) ""
  ["SCRIPT_URI"]=>
  string(53) "https://www.quantabio.com/product/sparq-library-prep/"
  ["SCRIPT_URL"]=>
  string(28) "/product/sparq-library-prep/"
  ["UNIQUE_ID"]=>
  string(27) "Y45QYd1VXQlZ3EDKfGEp1gAAAAk"
  ["REDIRECT_STATUS"]=>
  string(3) "200"
  ["REDIRECT_SSL_TLS_SNI"]=>
  string(17) "www.quantabio.com"
  ["REDIRECT_HTTPS"]=>
  string(2) "on"
  ["REDIRECT_HTTP_AUTHORIZATION"]=>
  string(0) ""
  ["REDIRECT_SCRIPT_URI"]=>
  string(53) "https://www.quantabio.com/product/sparq-library-prep/"
  ["REDIRECT_SCRIPT_URL"]=>
  string(28) "/product/sparq-library-prep/"
  ["REDIRECT_UNIQUE_ID"]=>
  string(27) "Y45QYd1VXQlZ3EDKfGEp1gAAAAk"
  ["FCGI_ROLE"]=>
  string(9) "RESPONDER"
  ["PHP_SELF"]=>
  string(10) "/index.php"
  ["REQUEST_TIME_FLOAT"]=>
  float(1670271073.4258)
  ["REQUEST_TIME"]=>
  int(1670271073)
  ["SUCURIREAL_REMOTE_ADDR"]=>
  string(13) "185.93.229.32"
}

sparQ DNA Library Prep Kit

Streamlined, versatile single-tube solution for high quality library prep
Features & Benefits
  • Fast, easy single-tube solution completes library prep in 2.5 hours
  • Suitable for a wide range of input amounts from as low as 250 pg
  • Optimized chemistry ensuring superior library prep sensitivity and efficiency
  • Higher library yields compared to other library prep kits
  • High efficiency enables PCR-free workflow from 100 ng input

 

sparQ DNA Library Prep Kit is intended for molecular biology applications. This product is not intended for the diagnosis, prevention or treatment of a disease.

Product
Kit Size
Order Info
Product
Kit Size
Order Info
sparQ DNA Library Prep Kit
Request Sample
Kit Size:
Order Info:

Description

sparQ DNA Library Prep Kit is optimized for the rapid construction of DNA libraries from fragmented double-stranded DNA for sequencing on Illumina® NGS platforms. The simplified protocol speeds up library prep to 2.5 hours with minimal hands-on time and accommodates DNA input amounts from 250 pg to 1 ug. DNA polishing reactions are streamlined into a single step to convert fragmented DNA into 5'-phosphorylated and 3'-dA-tailed DNA fragments. This is followed by high efficiency adapter ligation in the same tube. PCR-free workflows are enabled from 100 ng of starting material. If library amplification is required, the HiFi PCR Master Mix and Primer Mix ensure even amplification with minimal bias.


 

NGS Automation

Quantabio sparQ Frag & Library Prep Kit can be fully automated

Currently sparQ Frag & Library Prep Kit is supported by the following vendors:

Vendor Automation Platform(s)
PerkinElmer Applied Genomics SCICLONE G3 NGSx
Tecan DreamPrep™ NGS
Beckman Coulter in development

 

Looking for more information or for different automation vendor?

Contact Us

 


 

sparQ UDI Adapter Resources

Setting up sparQ Library Prep kits in Illumina Experiment Manager

Video Tutorial

Watch the step-by-step tutorial illustrating the sparQ DNA Library Prep Kit protocol


 

sparQ UDI Adapter Resource

For help setting up UDI’s in Illumina Experiment Manager Download


 

Featured Video

sparQ NGS Library Prep Solutions


 

Details

Details

Contents

 

 

Volume

Component Description

Cap Color

95191-024

95191-096

DNA Polishing Enzyme Mix

Blue

1 x 0.24 ml

1 x 0.96 ml

DNA Polishing Buffer

Blue

1 x 0.12 ml

1 x 0.48 ml

DNA Ligase

Orange

1 x 0.24 ml

1 x 0.96 ml

DNA Rapid Ligation Buffer

Orange

1 x 0.48 ml

2 x 0.96 ml

HiFi PCR Master Mix (2X)

White

1 x 0.60 ml

2 x 1.25 ml

Primer Mix

White

1 x 0.072 ml

1 x 0.144 ml

Customer Testimonials

Customer Testimonials

sparQ DNA Library Prep Kit

"Very easy to use."

Scientist | University Sherbrooke

Details

Contents

 

 

Volume

Component Description

Cap Color

95191-024

95191-096

DNA Polishing Enzyme Mix

Blue

1 x 0.24 ml

1 x 0.96 ml

DNA Polishing Buffer

Blue

1 x 0.12 ml

1 x 0.48 ml

DNA Ligase

Orange

1 x 0.24 ml

1 x 0.96 ml

DNA Rapid Ligation Buffer

Orange

1 x 0.48 ml

2 x 0.96 ml

HiFi PCR Master Mix (2X)

White

1 x 0.60 ml

2 x 1.25 ml

Primer Mix

White

1 x 0.072 ml

1 x 0.144 ml

Performance Data

Resources

Publications

Transient upregulation of IRF1 during exit from naive pluripotency confers viral protection
Merrit Romeike - 2022
Abstract
Stem cells intrinsically express a subset of genes which are normally associated with interferon stimulation and the innate immune response. However, the expression of these interferon-stimulated genes (ISG) in stem cells is independent from external stimuli such as viral infection. Here, we show that the interferon regulatory factor 1, Irf1, is directly controlled by the murine formative pluripotency gene regulatory network and transiently upregulated during the transition from naive to formative pluripotency. IRF1 binds to regulatory regions of a conserved set of ISGs and is required for their faithful expression upon exit from naive pluripotency. We show that in the absence of IRF1, cells exiting the naive pluripotent stem cell state are more susceptible to viral infection. Irf1 therefore acts as a link between the formative pluripotency network, regulation of innate immunity genes, and defense against viral infections during formative pluripotency.
Six de novo assemblies from pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum
James C. Fulton - 2021
Abstract
Fusarium wilt, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (Fon), is a soilborne disease which significantly limits yield in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and occasionally causes the loss of an entire year’s harvest. Reference-quality de novo genomic assemblies of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains were generated using a combination of next-generation and third-generation sequencing technologies. Chromosomal-level genomes were produced with representatives from all Fon races facilitating comparative genomic analysis and the identification of chromosomal structural variation . Syntenic analysis between isolates allowed differentiation of the core and lineage-specific portions of their genomes. This research will support future efforts to refine the scientific understanding of the molecular and genetic factors underpinning the Fon host range, develop diagnostic assays for each of the four races, and decipher the evolutionary history of race 3.
Six de novo assemblies from pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum
James C. Fulton - 2021
Abstract
Fusarium wilt, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. niveum (Fon), is a soilborne disease which significantly limits yield in watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) and occasionally causes the loss of an entire year’s harvest. Reference-quality de novo genomic assemblies of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains were generated using a combination of next-generation and third-generation sequencing technologies. Chromosomal-level genomes were produced with representatives from all Fon races facilitating comparative genomic analysis and the identification of chromosomal structural variation . Syntenic analysis between isolates allowed differentiation of the core and lineage-specific portions of their genomes. This research will support future efforts to refine the scientific understanding of the molecular and genetic factors underpinning the Fon host range, develop diagnostic assays for each of the four races, and decipher the evolutionary history of race 3.
Whole Genome Sequence based Capsular Typing and Antimicrobial Resistance Prediction of Group B Streptococcal Isolates from Colonized Pregnant Women in Nigeria
Mienye Bob-Manuel - 2018
Abstract
Background: Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is one of the major bacterial pathogens responsible for neonatal sepsis. Whole genome sequencing has, in recent years, emerged as a reliable tool for capsular typing and antimicrobial resistance prediction. This study characterized vaginal and rectal isolates of Group B Streptococcus obtained from pregnant women in Port Harcourt, Nigeria using a whole-genome sequence-based approach. Results: Capsular types Ia, Ib, II, III, IV and V were detected among the 43 isolates sequenced. Twelve sequence types (STs) were identied, with ST19 (n=9, 27.3%) and ST486 (n=5, 15.2%) the most frequent among non-duplicated isolates. Of the alpha-like proteins (alp) identied, Alp1 was the most prevalent in 11 (33.3%) isolates. Macrolide and lincosamide resistance determinants were present in 15 (45.5%) isolates; ermB was detected in 1 (3%) and ermTR in 7 (21.2%) isolates. The lnu gene, was detected in 6 (18.2%) and mef was identied in 3 (9.1%) isolates. Resistance of GBS to erythromycin and clindamycin was found to be 30.3% and 24.2%, respectively. All isolates were resistant to tetracycline with only the tetM gene identied. Fluoroquinolone-resistance conferring substitutions in gyrA + parC were detected in 9 (27.3%) isolates and chloramphenicol resistance was predicted in 11 (33.3%). Conclusion: The data available from the whole genome sequencing of these isolates offers a small but insightful description of common serotypes and resistance features within colonizing GBS in Nigeria
A Cross-Sectional Study of Dairy Cattle Metagenomes Reveals Increased Antimicrobial Resistance in Animals Farmed in a Heavy Metal Contaminated Environment
Natalia Carrillo Gaeto - 2020
Abstract
The use of heavy metals in economic and social development can create an accumulation of toxic waste in the environment. High concentrations of heavy metals can damage human and animal health, lead to the development of antibiotic resistance, and possibly change in bovine microbiota. It is important to investigate the influence of heavy metals in food systems to determine potential harmful effects environmental heavy metal contamination on human health. Because of a mining dam rupture, 43 million cubic meters of iron ore waste flowed into the Doce river basin surrounding Mariana City, Brazil, in 2015. Following this environmental disaster, we investigated the consequences of long-term exposure to contaminated drinking water on the microbiome and resistome of dairy cattle. We identified bacterial antimicrobial resistance (AMR) genes in the feces, rumen fluid, and nasopharynx of 16 dairy cattle 4 years after the environmental disaster. Cattle had been continuously exposed to heavy metal contaminated water until sample collection (A) and compared them to analogous samples from 16 dairy cattle in an unaffected farm, 356 km away (B). The microbiome and resistome of farm A and farm B differed in many aspects. The distribution of genes present in the cattle’s nasopharynx, rumen, and feces conferring AMR was highly heterogeneous, and most genes were present in only a few samples. The relative abundance and prevalence (presence/absence) of AMR genes were higher in farm A than in farm B. Samples from farm A had a higher prevalence (presence) of genes conferring resistance to multiple drugs, metals, biocides, and multi-compound resistance. Fecal samples had a higher relative abundance of AMR genes, followed by rumen fluid samples, and the nasopharynx had the lowest relative abundance of AMR genes detected. Metagenome functional annotation suggested that selective pressures of heavy metal exposure potentially skewed pathway diversity toward fewer, more specialized functions. This is the first study that evaluates the consequences of a Brazilian environmental accident with mining ore dam failure in the microbiome of dairy cows. Our findings suggest that the long-term persistence of heavy metals in the environment may result in differences in the microbiota and enrichment of antimicrobial-resistant bacteria. Our results also suggest that AMR genes are most readily detected in fecal samples compared to rumen and nasopharyngeal samples which had relatively lower bacterial read counts. Since heavy metal contamination has an effect on the animal microbiome, environmental management is warranted to protect the food system from hazardous consequences.
Draft Genome Sequence of Phyllobacterium endophythicum mTS5, Isolated from Lupinus micranthus in Tunisia
Zoé Waller - 2020
Abstract
We report here the draft genome sequence of Phyllobacterium endophyticum mTS5, isolated from a Lupinus micranthus root nodule. The genome consists of 5,454,168 bp, with a GC content of 57%, and contains 5,676 protein-coding sequences.
Genomic Insights and Ecological Adaptations of Deep-Subsurface and Near Subsurface Thermococcus Isolates
Lilja Caitlin Strang - 2020
Abstract
Members of the Archaeal genus Thermococcus are sulfur-dependent hyperthermophiles found in hydrothermal vents throughout the world. Previous analysis of a Thermococcus culture collection containing isolates from the Juan de Fuca Ridge, Gorda Ridge, and South East Pacific Rise using amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis and multilocus sequence typing revealed a distinct clade of Thermococcus isolated from the 1996 megaplume event at Gorda Ridge, indicating that they originated from a deep-subsurface habitat. The aim of this study was to elucidate the functional adaptations that allow for the survival of the Gorda Ridge clade in a deepsubsurface habitat as compared to representative Thermococcus isolates from shallow subsurface environments. This was accomplished through a pangenomic analysis of representative isolates in this clade and others from this culture collection. The Gorda Ridge megaplume group was enriched for genes relating to DNA repair and stabilization including a predicted endonuclease distantly related to Archaeal Holliday junction resolvase, DNA mismatch repair ATPase mutS, CRISPR/Cas elements, and dnaK (hsp70). The group was also enriched for ABC-type branched-chain amino acid (BCAA) transport system, enzymes for the Shikimate pathway for aromatic amino acid synthesis, as well as TupA for tungstate transport. These findings suggest that Thermococcus inhabiting deep-subsurface fluid reservoir require the added ability to prevent and repair damage to their DNA, presumably due to the energy demands of DNA replication. The enrichment in BCAA and tungstate transporters may indicate the use of an amino acid catabolism pathway followed by fermentation catalyzed by the tungstopterin containing enzymes aldehyde ferredoxin oxidoreductase and alcohol dehydrogenase, suggesting a preference for peptides over carbohydrates as an energy source in the deep-subsurface.
Detailed temporal dissection of an enhancer cluster reveals two distinct roles for individual elements
Henry Thomas - 2020
Abstract
Many genes are regulated by multiple enhancers that often simultaneously activate their target gene. Yet, how individual enhancers collaborate to activate transcription is not well understood. Here, we dissect the functions and interdependencies of five enhancer elements that form a previously identified enhancer cluster and activate the Fgf5 locus during exit from naïve murine pluripotency. Four elements are located downstream of the Fgf5 gene and form a super-enhancer. Each of these elements contributes to Fgf5 induction at a distinct time point of differentiation. The fifth element is located in the first intron of the Fgf5 gene and contributes to Fgf5 expression at every time point by amplifying overall Fgf5 expression levels. This amplifier element strongly accumulates paused RNA Polymerase II but does not give rise to a mature Fgf5 mRNA. By transplanting the amplifier to a different genomic position, we demonstrate that it enriches for high levels of paused RNA Polymerase II autonomously. Based on our data, we propose a model for a mechanism by which RNA Polymerase II accumulation at a novel type of enhancer element, the amplifier, contributes to enhancer collaboration.
Click here to see all Publications

Customer Testimonials

sparQ DNA Library Prep Kit

"Very easy to use."

Scientist | University Sherbrooke

Product Finder

Select Your Assay

Starting Template

Assay Format

Detection Chemistry

Multiplexing (more than 3 targets)

Is gene-specific priming (GSP) required?

What current Reverse Transcriptase or cDNA kit are you using?

Select the group which contains your real-time PCR cycler

  • Applied Biosystems 7500
  • Applied Biosystems 7500 Fast
  • Stratagene Mx3000P®
  • Stratagene Mx3005P™
  • Stratagene Mx4000™
  • Applied Biosystems ViiA 7
  • Applied Biosystems QuantStudio™
  • Agilent AriaMx
  • Douglas Scientific IntelliQube®
  • Applied Biosystems 5700
  • Applied Biosystems 7000
  • Applied Biosystems 7300
  • Applied Biosystems 7700
  • Applied Biosystems 7900
  • Applied Biosystems 7900HT
  • Applied Biosystems 7900 HT Fast
  • Applied Biosystems StepOne™
  • Applied Biosystems StepOnePlus™
  • Quantabio Q
  • BioRad CFX
  • Roche LightCycler 480
  • QIAGEN Rotor-Gene Q
  • Other
  • BioRad iCycler iQ™
  • BioRad MyiQ™
  • BioRad iQ™5

Choose your application from the categories below

Products

I give Quantabio or an authorized Quantabio distributor permission to contact me for product updates and news.
* Required information